In the News

Washington Post:

Still, as Oaksterdam preaches the gospel of pot entrepreneurism, its history offers a lesson in harsh reality. Robert Raich, a lawyer who has twice argued legalization cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, makes that lesson explicit in Cannabusiness 102, where he warns students of the risk inherent in cultivating a Schedule 1 drug.
Read more…

East Bay Express:

The San Francisco District Attorney’s office stated in a court memo this month that sales of medical marijuana at dispensaries are illegal. It was news to us, and news to Oakland lawyer and cannabis law expert Robert Raich, who took a cannabis case to the U.S. Supreme Court. Raich sent us this email outlining why DA’s office is off-base.
Read more…

New York Times:

The city’s public health department treats a private party at a public place as if it were in a private home, so medical cannabis at such an event would be fine, according to Nancy Sarieh, a spokeswoman for the city’s public health department; Robert Raich, a lawyer who specializes in medical-cannibas law, concurred.
Read more…

San Francisco Chronicle:

“Under California law, an employer may require pre-employment drug tests and take illegal drug use into consideration in making employment decisions,” the court said. “Ross gives great discretion to employers,” said Oakland attorney Robert Raich, a medical marijuana expert. Employers can prohibit employees in California from possessing, using or being under the influence of marijuana at work, just as they can forbid them from being drunk on the job.
Read more…

East Bay Express:

Having a good lawyer can mean the difference between a successful canna-business and a stint in county. Yet there are very few ways to order up an experienced, well-referenced attorney specialized in local cannabis business formation, intellectual property, or inter-state franchising law. Now filling that gap is the East Bay-centric National Cannabis Bar Association, which formally launches today at CanBAR.org.
Read more…

Smell The Truth:

“We essentially have wet and dry cities here,” said Oakland attorney Robert Raich – a noted specialist in marijuana law.
Read more…

Drug Truth Network:

“It’s absolute craziness. The idea that if you are a medical researcher and want to work with medical cannabis to try to find what benefits it may have for patients is practically impossible in the United States. It’s ironically harder to do medical research with cannabis – a natural plant that grows out of the ground – than it is with any number of other Schedule I Controlled Substances that might really be dangerous drugs.”
Read more…

East Bay Express:

Oakland lawyer and noted medical marijuana figure Robert Raich writes, “All medical cannabis supporters should unite in advocating that authority for the regulation of medical cannabis be vested within almost any agency EXCEPT the ABC.”
Read more…

West Coast Leaf:

“The state Supreme Court will affect the future of California medical cannabis dispensaries in 2013 by ruling on whether […state law…] prevents municipalities from banning dispensaries. Thus far, answers from the various courts of appeal have been decidedly contradictory.”
Read more…

The Boston Phoenix:

“As a practical matter, the feds have neither the resources nor the desire to prosecute patients,” Raich says. According to Raich, the vast majority of marijuana cases — a whopping 99 percent — are handled by state and local authorities. “It’s not really been the feds’ policy to attack patients,” he says.
Read more…

The Atlantic Wire:

The federal government’s War on Drugs has hit Montana the hardest out of any state, according to Robert Raich, lawyer who has brought two medical marijuana cases before the Supreme court. Fearing that Williams doesn’t stand a chance in these trials, Raich says, “The War on Drugs is too sacrosanct a sacred cow for the courts to weigh in favor.” As you’ll see in this New York Times mini-documentary, Williams wasn’t running just any old shady operation. He graciously showed off his digs to state legislators and Montana law enforcement officers. Last week, activists in Montana rolled out a ballot proposal to make pot legal in 2014.
Read more…

Ladybud:

“Deputy Cimino goes so far as to mislead his readers among the CNOA membership by making misrepresentations that are demonstratively and completely false. For example, Cimino declares that hash and concentrated cannabis allegedly have no protection under California’s medical cannabis laws. In fact, an opinion reluctantly issued by none other than Attorney General Dan Lungren’s office shortly after the passage of Prop. 215 confirmed that concentrated cannabis is indeed legal pursuant to the Compassionate Use Act. Attorney General Bill Lockyer’s office subsequently issued an opinion reaching the very same conclusion.”
Read more…

Redding Record Searchlight:

“This is the first appellate court ruling that has directly opined on cultivation regulations,” said Oakland attorney Robert Raich, a medical cannabis legal expert who serves on CalNORML’s legal committee.

Read more…

Comments on this entry are closed.